From their Voices: How Black Male Administrators Navigate Racism in Higher Education

with Domonic Rollins

About This Course

Higher education, an institution founded on inequity, has long harbored institutional racism making it difficult for Black male administrators to achieve equitable outcomes with their White peers. This online briefing highlights results from a dissertation study investigating how Black male administrators navigate racism in higher education. Results from this dissertation study are used to inform a new theory and concepts about navigating racism in higher education.

In 2017, the lives of Black men are a complete paradox (Jenkins, 2006).  In a historic moment more than eight years ago, the United States, a nation founded on prejudice and racial discrimination, elected its first Black man to the presidency.  And, for many people, the election, and subsequent reelection of President Barak Obama signified the end of racism in the United States. Yet, it is commonplace for Black men, regardless of age, socioeconomic class, or location, to wonder whether their life is at risk because they are Black.

What’s more is that higher education, an institution founded on inequity, has long harbored institutional racism making it difficult for Black male administrators to achieve equitable outcomes with their White peers. This online briefing highlights results from a dissertation study investigating how Black male administrators navigate racism in higher education.  Using a constructivist grounded theory approach; this presentation shares findings from interview data to unearth the process by which Black male administrators navigate racism. Critical Race Theory is used as a methodological guide and analytic tool for the presentation.  Emerging results from this dissertation study are used to inform a new theory and concepts about navigating racism in higher education.

Learning Outcomes

Participants will:

  • identify the role of racism for Black male administrators in higher education;
  • learn about strategies that Black male administrators use to navigate racism; and
  • reflect on their respective campus climate’s support for Black male administrators.

Accessing the Presentation

Once you complete your registration, you will be able to access the course by clicking on the "Login" button at the top of this page (or any page on olc.naspa.org).

  • You will be asked to login with your NASPA user name and password. Once you have done so, you will hit continue and be redirected to your dashboard in the Online Learning Community.

  • You will find the session listed under "Enrolled."

  • By clicking into, "Contents," you will find the session recording, resources, and PowerPoint slides. You may view the materials as many times as you'd like, at whatever pace you would like.

  • If you have any difficulty accessing the materials, please contact Jace Kirschner (jkirschner@naspa.org).





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